The Maldives is a picture-perfect archipelago, situated in the middle of the Indian Ocean, and home to 1,190+ tiny coral islands: for sale


The Maldives is a picture-perfect archipelago, situated in the middle of the Indian Ocean, and home to 1,190+ tiny coral islands

Maldives

NEGOTIABLE

92 000 000 USD

Agent: Cliff Jacobs - Managing Principal Estate Agent & CEO (Nat.Dpl.Hotel Man (UJ). M.P.R.E.)
Agent Cellphone: +27 (0) 84 413 1071 / +27 (0) 61 716 6951
Agent Office Number: +27 (0) 21 554 0283
Agent Email Address: cliff@exquisitehotelconsultants.com
Type: Beach Resort
Bedrooms: 0
Bathrooms: 0
Parking: 0
Yield: Not Disclosed


The Maldives, officially the Republic of Maldives, is a small island nation in South Asia, situated in the Arabian Sea of the Indian Ocean. It lies southwest of Sri Lanka and India, about 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) from the Asian continent. The chain of 26 atolls stretches from Ihavandhippolhu Atoll in the north to Addu Atoll in the south to the Equator. Comprising a territory spanning roughly 298 square kilometres (115 sq mi), the Maldives is one of the world's most geographically dispersed sovereign states as well as the smallest Asian country by land area and population, with around 515,696 inhabitants. Malé is the capital and the most populated city, traditionally called the "King's Island" where the ancient royal dynasties ruled for its central location.

The Maldives archipelago is located on the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge, a vast submarine mountain range in the Indian Ocean; this also forms a terrestrial ecoregion, together with the Chagos Archipelago and Lakshadweep. With an average ground-level elevation of 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) above sea level, it is the world's lowest-lying country, with even its highest natural point being one of the lowest in the world, at 5.1 metres (17 ft).

In the 12th century, Islam reached the Maldivian archipelago, which was consolidated as a sultanate, developing strong commercial and cultural ties with Asia and Africa. From the mid-16th-century the region came under the increasing influence of European colonial powers, with the Maldives becoming a British protectorate in 1887. Independence from the United Kingdom came in 1965, and a presidential republic was established in 1968 with an elected People Majilis. The ensuing decades have seen political instability, efforts at democratic reform, and environmental challenges posed by climate change.

The Maldives became a founding member of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC). It is also a member of the United Nations, the Commonwealth of Nations, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, and the Non-Aligned Movement. The World Bank classifies the Maldives as having an upper-middle-income economy. fishing has historically been the dominant economic activity and remains the largest sector by far, followed by the rapidly growing tourism industry. The Maldives rate "high" on the Human Development Index, with per-capita income significantly higher than other SAARC nations.

The Maldives was a member of the Commonwealth from July 1982 until withdrawing from the organisation in October 2016 in protest at allegations by the other nations of its human-rights abuses and failing democracy. The Maldives rejoined the Commonwealth on 1 February 2020 after showing evidence of functioning democratic processes and popular support.

According to legends, the first settlers of the Maldives were people known as Dheyvis. The first Kingdom of the Maldives was known as Dheeva Maari. In the 3rd century BC during the visit of emissaries sent by Emperor Asoka, Maldives was known as Dheeva Mahal.

During c. 1100 - 1166, Maldives was also referred as Diva Kudha and the Laccadive archipelago which was a part of Maldives was then referred to as Diva Khanbar by the scholar and polymath al-Biruni (973-1048).

The name Maldives may also derive from Sanskrit meaning ("Necklace Islands") in Sinhala. The Maldivian people are called Dhivehin. The word Dheeb/Deeb (archaic Dhivehi, related to Sanskrit) means "island", and Dhives (Dhivehin) means "islanders" (i.e., Maldivians).

The ancient Sri Lankan chronicle Mahawamsa refers to an island called Mahiladiva ("Island of Women") in Pali, which is probably a mistranslation of the same Sanskrit word meaning "garland".

Jan Hogendorn, Grossman Professor of Economics, theorises that the name Maldives derives from the Sanskrit meaning "garland of islands". In Tamil, "Garland of Islands" can be translated as Malai Theevu. In Malayalam, "Garland of Islands" can be translated as Maladweepu. In Kannada, "Garland of Islands" can be translated as Maaledweepa. None of these names is mentioned in any literature, but classical Sanskrit texts dating back to the Vedic period mention the "Hundred Thousand Islands" (Lakshadweepa), a generic name which would include not only the Maldives, but also the Laccadives, Aminidivi Islands, Minicoy, and the Chagos island groups.

Some medieval travellers such as Ibn Battuta called the islands Mahal Dibiyat from the Arabic word mahal ("palace"), which must be how the Berber traveller interpreted the local name, having been through Muslim North India, where Perso-Arabic words were introduced to the local vocabulary. This is the name currently inscribed on the scroll in the Maldive state emblem. The classical Persian/Arabic name for the Maldives is Dibajat.The Dutch referred to the islands as the Maldivische Eilanden, while the British anglicised the local name for the islands first to the "Maldive Islands" and later to "Maldives".[30]

Garcia da Orta writes in a conversational book first published in 1563, writes as follows: "I must tell you that I have heard it said that the natives do not call it Maldiva but Nalediva. In the Malabar language, nale means four and diva island. So that in that language the word signifies "four islands," while we, corrupting the name, call it Maldiva."

History

Ancient history and settlement

According to the book "Kitāb fi āthār Mīdhu al-qādimah ("On the Ancient Ruins of Meedhoo") written in the 17th century in Arabic by Allama Ahmed Shihabuddine (Allama Shihab al-Din) of Meedhoo in Addu Atoll, the first settlers of the Maldives were people known as Dheyvis. They came from the Kalibanga in India. The time of their arrival is unknown but it was before Emperor Asoka's kingdom in 269-232 BC. Shihabuddine's story tallies remarkably well with the recorded history of South Asia and that of copperplate documents of the Maldives known as Loamaafaanu.

The Maapanansa, the copper plates on which was recorded the history of the first Kings of the Maldives from the Solar Dynasty, were lost quite early on.

A 4th-century notice written by Ammianus Marcellinus (362 AD) speaks of gifts sent to the Roman emperor Julian by a deputation from the nation of Divi. The name Divi is very similar to Dheyvi who were the first settlers of Maldives.

The ancient history of Maldives is told in copperplates, ancients scripts carved on coral artifacts, traditions, language and different ethnicities of Maldivians.

The first Maldivians did not leave any archaeological artifacts. Their buildings were probably built of wood, palm fronds, and other perishable materials, which would have quickly decayed in the salt and wind of the tropical climate. Moreover, chiefs or headmen did not reside in elaborate stone palaces, nor did their religion require the construction of large temples or compounds.

Comparative studies of Maldivian oral, linguistic, and cultural traditions confirm that the first settlers were people from the southern shores of the neighboring Indian subcontinent, including the Giraavaru people, mentioned in ancient legends and local folklore about the establishment of the capital and kingly rule in Malé.

A strong underlying layer of Dravidian population and culture survives in Maldivian society, with a clear Tamil-Malayalam substratum in the language, which also appears in place names, kinship terms, poetry, dance, and religious beliefs. Malabari seafaring culture led to the settlement of the Islands by Malayali seafarers.

Buddhist period

Isdhoo Lōmāfānu is the oldest copper-plate book to have been discovered in the Maldives to date. The book was written in AD 1194 (590 AH) in the Evēla form of the Divehi akuru, during the reign of Siri Fennaadheettha Mahaa Radun (Dhinei Kalaminja).

Despite being just mentioned briefly in most history books, the 1,400-year-long Buddhist period has foundational importance in the history of the Maldives. It was during this period that the culture of the Maldives both developed and flourished, a culture that survives today. The Maldivian language, early Maldive scripts, architecture, ruling institutions, customs, and manners of the Maldivians originated at the time when the Maldives were a Buddhist kingdom.

Buddhism probably spread to the Maldives in the 3rd century BC at the time of Emperor Ashoka's expansion and became the dominant religion of the people of the Maldives until the 12th century AD. The ancient Maldivian Kings promoted Buddhism, and the first Maldive writings and artistic achievements, in the form of highly developed sculpture and architecture, originate from that period. Nearly all archaeological remains in the Maldives are from Buddhist stupas and monasteries, and all artifacts found to date display characteristic Buddhist iconography.

Buddhist (and Hindu) temples were Mandala shaped. They are oriented according to the four cardinal points with the main gate facing east. Local historian Hassan Ahmed Maniku counted as many as 59 islands with Buddhist archaeological sites in a provisional list he published in 1990.

Islamic period

Compared to the other areas of South Asia, the conversion of the Maldives to Islam happened relatively late. Arab traders had converted populations in the Malabar Coast since the 7th century. The Maldives remained a Buddhist kingdom for another 500 years after the conversion of Malabar Coast and Sindh—perhaps as the southwesternmost Buddhist country. Arabic became the prime language of administration (instead of Persian and Urdu), and the Maliki school of jurisprudence was introduced, both hinting at direct contacts with the core of the Arab world.

Middle Eastern seafarers had just begun to take over the Indian Ocean trade routes in the 10th century and found the Maldives to be an important link in those routes as the first landfall for traders from Basra sailing to Southeast Asia. Trade involved mainly cowrie shells—widely used as a form of currency throughout Asia and parts of the East African coast—and coir fiber. The Bengal Sultanate, where cowrie shells were used as legal tender, was one of the principal trading partners of the Maldives. The Bengal–Maldives cowry shell trade was the largest shell currency trade network in history.

The other essential product of the Maldives was coir, the fibre of the dried coconut husk, resistant to saltwater. It stitched together and rigged the dhows that plied the Indian Ocean. Maldivian coir was exported to Sindh, China, Yemen, and the Persian Gult.

Colonial period

In 1558 the Portuguese established a small garrison with a Viador (Viyazoru), or overseer of a factory (trading post) in the Maldives, which they administered from their main colony in Goa. Their attempts to impose Christianity provoked a local revolt led by Muhammad Thakurufaanu al-A'uzam and his two brothers, that fifteen years later drove the Portuguese out of Maldives. This event is now commemorated as National Day.

In the mid-17th century, the Dutch, who had replaced the Portuguese as the dominant power in Ceylon, established hegemony over Maldivian affairs without involving themselves directly in local matters, which were governed according to centuries-old Islamic customs.

The British expelled the Dutch from Ceylon in 1796 and included the Maldives as a British protected area. The status of Maldives as a British protectorate was officially recorded in an 1887 agreement in which the sultan accepted British influence over Maldivian external relations and defense while retaining home rule, which continued to be regulated by Muslim traditional institutions in exchange for an annual tribute. The status of the islands was akin to other British protectorates in the Indian Ocean region, including Zanzibar and the  Trucial States.

In the British period, the Sultan's powers were taken over by the Chief Minister, much to the chagrin of the British Governor-General who continued to deal with the ineffectual Sultan. Consequently, Britain encouraged the development of a constitutional monarchy, and the first Constitution was proclaimed in 1932. However, the new arrangements favoured neither the aging Sultan nor the wily Chief Minister, but rather a young crop of British-educated reformists. As a result, angry mobs were instigated against the Constitution which was publicly torn up.

The Maldives remained a British crown protectorate until 1953 when the sultanate was suspended and the First Republic was declared under the short-lived presidency of Muhammad Amin Didi. While serving as prime minister during the 1940s, Didi nationalized the fish export industry. As president, he is remembered as a reformer of the education system and a promoter of women's rights. Conservatives in Malé eventually ousted his government, and during a riot over food shortages, Didi was beaten by a mob and died on a nearby island.

Beginning in the 1950s, the political history in the Maldives was largely influenced by the British military presence in the islands. In 1954 the restoration of the sultanate perpetuated the rule of the past. Two years later, the United Kingdom obtained permission to reestablish its wartime RAF Gan airfield in the southernmost Addu Atoll, employing hundreds of locals. In 1957, however, the new prime minister, Ibrahim Nasir, called for a review of the agreement. Nasir was challenged in 1959 by a local secessionist movement in the three southernmost atolls that benefited economically from the British presence on Gan. This group cut ties with the Maldives government and formed an independent state, the United Suvadive Republic with Abdullah Afif as president and Hithadhoo as capital. One year later the Suvadive republic was scrapped after Nasir sent gunboats from Malé with government police, and Abdulla Afif went into exile. Meanwhile, in 1960 the Maldives had allowed the United Kingdom to continue to use both the Gan and the Hitaddu facilities for a thirty-year period, with the payment of £750,000 over the period of 1960 to 1965 for the purpose of Maldives' economic development. The base was closed in 1976 as part of the larger British withdrawal of permanently stationed forces 'East of Suez'.

Independence and republic

In line with the broader British policy of decolonisation, on 26 July 1965 an agreement was signed on behalf of the Sultan by Ibrahim Nasir Rannabandeyri Kilegefan, Prime Minister, and on behalf of the British government by Sir Michael Walker, British Ambassador-designate to the Maldive Islands, which ended the British responsibility for the defense and external affairs of the Maldives. The islands thus achieved full political independence, with the ceremony taking place at the British High Commissioner's Residence in Colombo. After this, the sultanate continued for another three years under Sir Muhammad Fareed Didi, who declared himself King upon independence.

On 15 November 1967, a vote was taken in parliament to decide whether the Maldives should continue as a constitutional monarchy or become a republic. Of the 44 members of parliament, 40 voted in favour of a republic. On 15 March 1968, a national referendum was held on the question, and 93.34% of those taking part voted in favour of establishing a republic. The republic was declared on 11 November 1968, thus ending the 853-year-old monarchy, which was replaced by a republic under the presidency of Ibrahim Nasir. As the King had held little real power, this was seen as a cosmetic change and required few alterations in the structures of government.

Tourism began to be developed on the archipelago by the beginning of the 1970s. The first resort in the Maldives was Kurumba Maldives which welcomed the first guests on 3 October 1972. The first accurate census was held in December 1977 and showed 142,832 people living in the Maldives.

Political infighting during the 1970s between Nasir's faction and other political figures led to the 1975 arrest and exile of elected prime minister Ahmed Zaki to a remote atoll. Economic decline followed the closure of the British airfield at Gam and the collapse of the market for dried fish, an important export. With support for his administration faltering, Nasir fled to Singapore in 1978, with millions of dollars from the treasury.

Maumoon Abdul Gayoom began his 30-year role as president in 1978, winning six consecutive elections without opposition. His election was seen as ushering in a period of political stability and economic development in view of Maumoon's priority to develop the poorer islands. Tourism flourished and increased foreign contact spurred development. However, Maumoon's rule was controversial, with some critics saying Maumoon was an autocrat who quelled dissent by limiting freedoms and political favouritism.

A series of coup attempts (in 1980, 1983, and 1988) by Nasir supporters and business interests tried to topple the government without success. While the first two attempts met with little success, the 1988 coup attempt involved a roughly 80 strong mercenary force of the PLOTE who seized the airport and caused Maumoon to flee from house to house until the intervention of 1,600 Indian troops airlifted into Malé restored order.

A November 1988 coup was headed by Muhammadu Ibrahim Lutfee, a businessman. On the night of 3 November 1988, the Indian Air Force airlifted a parachute battalion group from Agra and flew them over 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) to the Maldives. The Indian paratroopers landed at Hulhulé and secured the airfield and restored the government rule at Malé within hours.

Twenty-first century

On 26 December 2004, following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, the Maldives were devastated by a tsunami. Only nine islands were reported to have escaped any flooding while fifty-seven islands faced serious damage to critical infrastructure, fourteen islands had to be totally evacuated, and six islands were destroyed. A further twenty-one resort islands were forced to close because of tsunami damage. The total damage was estimated at more than US$400 million, or some 62% of the GDP. 102 Maldivians and 6 foreigners reportedly died in the tsunami. The destructive impact of the waves on the low-lying islands was mitigated by the fact there was no continental shelf or landmass upon which the waves could gain height. The tallest waves were reported to be 14 feet (4.3 m) high.

The elections in late 2013 were highly contested. Former president Nasheed won the most votes in the first round, but the Supreme Court annulled it despite the positive assessment of international election observers. In the re-run vote Abdulla Yameen, half-brother of the former president Maumoon, assumed the presidency.  Yameen introduced increased engagement with China and promoted a policy of connecting Islam with anti-Western rhetoric. Yameen survived an assassination attempt in late 2015. Vice president Ahmed Adeeb was later arrested together with 17 supporters for "public order offenses" and the government instituted a broader crackdown against political dissent. 

In the 2018 elections, Ibrahim Mohamed Solih won the most votes and became President.

Adeeb was freed by courts in Male in July 2019 after his conviction on charges of terrorism and corruption was overruled, but was placed under a travel ban after the state prosecutor appealed the order in a corruption and money laundering case. Adeeb escaped in a tugboat to seek asylum in India. It is understood that the Indian Coast Guard escorted the tugboat to the International Maritime Boundary Line (IMBL) and he was then “transferred” to a Maldivian Coast Guard ship, where officials took him into custody.

Geography

Only near the southern end of this natural coral barricade do two open passages permit safe ship navigation from one side of the Indian Ocean to the other through the territorial waters of Maldives. For administrative purposes, the Maldivian government organised these atolls into 21 administrative divisions. The largest island of Maldives is that of Gan, which belongs to Laamu Atoll or Hahdhummathi Maldives. In Addu Atoll, the westernmost islands are connected by roads over the reef (collectively called Link Road) and the total length of the road is 14 km (9 mi).

The Maldives is the lowest country in the world, with maximum and average natural ground levels of only 2.4 metres (7 ft 10 in) and 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) above sea level, respectively. In areas where construction exists, however, this has been increased to several metres. More than 80 percent of the country's land is composed of coral islands which rise less than one metre above sea level. As a result, the Maldives are at high risk of being submerged due to rising sea levels. The UN's environmental panel has warned that, at current rates, sea-level rise would be high enough to make the Maldives uninhabitable by 2100.

Climate

The Maldives has a tropical monsoon cliimate (Am),  which is affected by the large landmass of South Asia to the north. Because the Maldives has the lowest elevation of any country in the world, the temperature is constantly hot and often humid. The presence of this landmass causes differential heating of land and water. These factors set off a rush of moisture-rich air from the Indian Ocean over South Asia, resulting in the southwest monsoon. Two seasons dominate Maldives' weather: the dry season associated with the winter northeastern monsoon and the rainy season associated with the southwest monsoon which brings strong winds and storms.

The shift from the dry northeast monsoon to the moist southwest monsoon occurs during April and May. During this period, the southwest winds contribute to the formation of the southwest monsoon, which reaches the Maldives in the beginning of June and lasts until the end of November. However, the weather patterns of Maldives do not always conform to the monsoon patterns of South Asia. The annual rainfall averages 254 centimetres (100 in) in the north and 381 centimetres (150 in) in the south.

The monsoonal influence is greater in the north of the Maldives than in the south, more influenced by the equatorial currents.

The average high temperature is 31.5 degrees Celsius and the average low temperature is 26.4 degrees Celsius.





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Key features

2 RESORTS FOR SALE:

RESORT NO 1

MALDIVIAN LUXURY BEACH RESORT  - PRICE U.S. $ 92,000.000

Located just 30 minutes’ flying time from Male’, your perfect Maldives island resort awaits. Our luxury Maldives villas sit over crystalline waters in the Baa Atoll UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. The resort we’ve created a welcoming atmosphere and personalised service to complement our world-class luxury villas and amenities.

The resort with villas and residences is lush, natural, spacious Maldives island with virgin landscape; nestled in the Baa Atoll UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. In the local language, the resort is ‘your island home’ and we strive to offer a highly personalised Maldives holiday experience. Our luxury Maldives pool villas and private residences are expansive havens of tropical bliss and serenity. At our resort, our conscious luxury lifestyle brings you closer to nature and enhances your wellness. Celebrate the gift of life and love with the ultimate Maldives holiday experience at one of the best Resort Maldives.

Our lush island offers 23.5 hectares of enchanting space to roam and play. With only 67 rooms - the vast majority over-water - this leaves a great deal of undeveloped jungle and green space. In the Maldives, it's rare luxury. Dedicated zones for rest, play, relaxation and rejuvenation. Secret beaches. Cycling and running track. Space for being at one with nature; precious time with your loved ones.

The resort is a Maldives private island resort blessed with verdant scenery including lush tropical trees, untouched virgin foliage and colourful exotic flowers.

Experience a natural, untouched wonderland of marine life nestled within the Baa Atoll UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. Renowned for its abundance of marine species like mantas and whale sharks; a plethora of underwater adventures await you - whether you’re a snorkeller, scuba diver, nature-lover or simply enjoy playing out on the water.

Formerly known as Ocean Reef House

Gaze out across the reef from the comfort of your luxurious bed, or dangle your feet from your private balcony and watch fish dart through the water beneath you. These reef villas are perfect for snorkellers; suspended directly over a world of colourful marine life. Slide straight from your villa into the water and spend hours exploring our mesmerising house reef.

230sqm | Overwater | Reef side

TREETOP POOL VILLA

Formerly known as Skyhouse

Tranquil treetop retreats tucked away 12 metres above the ground. Wrapped in a canopy of coconut trees and vast Maldivian skies; serenity infuses every part of these exceptional spaces. Swim across the infinity-edge pool as if you were flying over the treetops. Wake to the gentle sounds of tropical birdsong. Where being only 20 meters away from the beach will allow you the chance to take our secret pathway, shaded by coconut trees, to reach the beautiful white sand of your dedicated beach. Enjoy elevated sky views unparalleled in the Maldives. Available as 1 or 2-bedroom villas. 

220sqm | 1 or 2 bedrooms | Treetop villa

 

Standard Capacity of Two Guests

Maximum capacity of Three Adults or Two Adults + Two children

Essentials

  • 200sqm
  • 7ft king bed
  • Bathrobes and hairdryer
  • Air conditioning and overhead fans
  • Entertainment system
  • 42" TV with Blu-Ray player and satellite channels\
  • Complimentary Wifi
  • Complimentary bottled water
  • Safe

Complete privacy awaits you in our Residences Enclave. Tucked into their own side of the resort’s large island are palatial havens of space and light. Tremendous living spaces, indoor and outdoor encourage family time or fun with friends. Spacious bedrooms allow areas to escape and find solitude and peace. With a personal Katheeb (butler) to cater to your every need, a full kitchen to prepare delicious meals and your own buggy to explore all that the resort has to offer.

  

From their ultra-modern Miami-esque architecture to their stunning minimalist interiors, the six sublime 4 Bedroom Beach Residences deliver lashings of style. Each offers four supremely comfortable bedroom suites, acres of living space, a fabulously equipped kitchen and a private pool right on the beach.

MASTER SUITE

Occupying 110 square metres of luxurious space, the master suite accords residents the most spectacular ocean views.  Here, a palatial 2.3-metre bed faces the glass-fronted balcony and two richly upholstered armchairs provide a corner for reading, or just relaxing to the sound of the waves lapping the shore.  Wide teakwood doors to one side of the bedroom slide open to reveal a statement bathtub perfectly positioned for ocean-view bathing, and lead to an outdoor shower courtyard and a huge walk-in rain shower.  Behind is a dressing area with multiple wardrobes, seating, and a long vanity with double basins.  In the study area is more wardrobe space and a desk.

GUEST SUITES – UPPER LEVEL

Overlooking the garden at the rear of the villa are two mirror-image guest suites – one with a king-size bed, the other with twins.  Within each room is a comfortable seating area.  On the balcony, a statement bathtub veiled by a decorative screen gazes across a skyline of palms.  Between each suite’s entrance and sleeping area is a dressing area, WC enclosure and bathroom with twin basins and walk-in rain shower.  The king bedroom also features an alfresco rain shower courtyard.

GUEST SUITE – GARDEN LEVEL

Just off the living room on the ground floor is the third guest suite, furnished with two single beds and adjoined by a shower room. This room is ideal for children or teens.

INDOOR LIVING

One of the myriad pleasures of a sojourn at the 4 Bedroom Villa Residences is the sheer amount of convivial living space. At the villa’s heart is a huge air-conditioned living and dining lounge, with glass sliding doors opening onto the garden on both sides and spectacular sea views. Here, chic seating encircles a large coffee table, and ten upholstered dining chairs are arranged around a teakwood table above a carpet of geometric tiles. Oversized pots, sculptural ceramics in organic shapes, a wealth of natural materials and a neutral sand-and-aqua palette echo the beach setting.

Above is the breezy fan-cooled majilis – a spacious lounge open on two sides, with glass balustrades optimising the sea vista. With its super-comfy modular seating and table tennis, this is a cool hang-out space for teens, and the perfect spot for sunset cocktails. (Families and friends renting adjacent villas will appreciate the huge doors that can slide back here to create an extra-large living space.)

Flowing seamlessly from the downstairs living area is the wonderfully sophisticated kitchen, well equipped with countless culinary gadgets including wine fridge and pro coffee maker. This is where the villa Katheeb prepares delicious breakfasts, or guests can perch at the marble-topped counter and admire the culinary skills of the resort chefs as a gourmet dinner is created before their eyes.

OUTDOOR LIVING

Blissful beachfront living at the 4 Bedroom Villa Residences begins on the open-sided dining deck where a table for eight extends under a teakwood roof, with oversized pale aqua director’s chairs mirroring their pool and ocean surroundings.  Alfresco meals here are magical – particularly when the pro-Fisher & Paykel barbecue is in play for a fresh-from-the-sea banquet prepared by one of Resort’s chefs.  Within the beach courtyard gardens clusters of seating rest on white sand in the shade of towering palms, and a pair of double sunbeds recline by the 11-metre infinity-edge swimming pool.  A large love seat beckons on the raised poolside sun deck, beyond which a double hammock sways gently among the beach-edge palms.

CAPACITY

8 people (4 en-suite bedrooms: 2 with king-sized beds and 2 with twin beds).  Can accommodate up to 2 additional guests on extra beds (extra charge) + a baby cot.

LIVING AREAS

Large air-conditioned living room with dining for 10; large upper-level fan-cooled Majilis lounge; covered outdoor dining terrace with table for 10; well-equipped kitchen; pool-edge sun deck; seating areas scattered in the courtyard gardens.

POOL

11 x 5 metre beach-edge swimming pool.

ISLANDERS

Residence manager overseeing all residences; housemaster (katheeb) and assistant housemaster, who can prepare snacks and light meals; housekeeping; maintenance; security. Our Chef is on call for special dining requests.

DINING

Providore:  an extensive grocery list from which guests pre-select complimentary food items which are stocked at the villa to cater for guest breakfasts and light lunches.  A second (chargeable) Providore list of premium meats, cheeses, fruits and other luxury items is also available.  Complimentary daily afternoon tea pastries and pre-dinner cocktail snacks.

Gourmet dining: (complimentary for low, shoulder and peak season bookings) offering Japanese, Mexican, Asian menus, plus seafood barbecues and grills or choose to dine complimentary at the resort restaurants: Bazaar [WOK, Barolo, Fish & Chip, Joe’s Pizza, Fresh and Bar]; Feeling Koi (fine Japanese/Mexican fusion dining), Emperor Beach Club (gourmet café and deli).  Home delivery available.

Wine Shop & Cellar Door:  extensive wine list charcuterie and cheese.

COMMUNICATION

Mobile phone, in-room phones; WiFi; computer and printer on request.

ENTERTAINMENT

iPods (living room and master bedroom); TVs and DVD players (living room and all bedrooms); selection of books and DVDs; table tennis table; PlayStation 4 (plus games); board games.

Available at 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, 3 bedroom and 4 bedrooms rates.

Master suite

Occupying 110 square metres of luxurious space, the master suite accords residents the most spectacular ocean views.  Here, a palatial 2.3-metre bed faces the glass-fronted balcony and two richly upholstered armchairs provide a corner for reading, or just relaxing to the sound of the waves lapping the shore.  Wide teakwood doors to one side of the bedroom slide open to reveal a statement bathtub perfectly positioned for ocean-view bathing, and lead to an outdoor shower courtyard and a huge walk-in rain shower.  Behind is a dressing area with multiple wardrobes, seating, and a long vanity with double basins.  In the study area is more wardrobe space and a desk.

Guest suites – upper level

Overlooking the garden at the rear of the villa are two mirror-image guest suites – one with a king-size bed, the other with twins.  Within each room is a comfortable seating area.  On the balcony, a statement bathtub veiled by a decorative screen gazes across a skyline of palms.  Between each suite’s entrance and sleeping area is a dressing area, WC enclosure and bathroom with twin basins and walk-in rain shower.  The king bedroom also features an alfresco rain shower courtyard.

Guest suite – garden level

Just off the living room on the ground floor is the third guest suite, furnished with two single beds and adjoined by a shower room. This room is ideal for children or teens.

Available at 2 bedroom, 4 bedroom, 6 bedrooms rates and 8 bedroom rates.

Master suite

Both occupying a massive 110 square metres of space on either side of The Great Villa Residence, two master suites accord residents the most spectacular views. In each, a palatial 2.3-metre bed faces the turquoise ocean beyond the balcony. Two richly upholstered armchairs provide a corner for reading, watching a film or listening to the surf. Broad teak doors to one side of the bed slide open onto a statement bath perfectly positioned for ocean-view bathing. A hallway links the alfresco shower courtyard and indoor rain shower alcove to the large dressing room and a vanity with double basins. In the study area at the suite’s entrance are more wardrobes and a desk.

Guest suites – upper level

Overlooking the gardens at the rear of the villa are two pairs of mirror-image guest suites – two with king-size beds, and two with twin beds. Within each room is a comfortable seating area. On the balconies, statement bathtubs veiled by decorative screens gaze across a skyline of palms. Between each suite’s entrance and sleeping area is a dressing area, WC enclosure and bathroom with twin basins and walk-in rain shower. The king bedrooms also feature alfresco rain shower courtyards.

Guest suite – garden level

Just off the living room on the ground floor are two more guest suites, each furnished with 2 single beds and adjoined by a shower room. These rooms are ideal for children or teens.

SUNSET WATER POOL  VILLA

Overlooking the breathtaking turquoise blue lagoon and offering uninterrupted sunset views, resort Sunset Water Pool Villas are a private oasis promising an unspoiled Maldivian experience for everyone who visits. The stylish 250 square meter houses offer direct access to the ocean and come with a freshwater pool, special in-room amenities &  your very own outdoor terrace for sunbathing or late-night stargazing.

10 units | 250 SqM | up to 03 Adults or 02 adults + 02 Children

  • 7ft King Size Bed
  • Direct Lagoon Access
  • Best Sunset Views
  • Private Fresh Water Pool
  • Garden Shower
  • Lagoon Hammock
  • Complimentary WiFi

REEF WATER POOL VILLA

Resort Reef Water Pool Villas marry the union of Sky and Sea, with breathtaking views of the ocean from the sundeck of Private Overwater Pool. It is an intimate, luxurious overwater villa for perfect for two. Polished timber floors, a deep ceramic tub, a complete entertainment system. The Reef Water Pool Villa is positioned overwater & offers doorstep access to the Islands spectacular House reef, teeming with marine life, an abundance of coral just metres below.

23 units | 230 SqM | up to 03 Adults or 02 adults + 02 Children

  • 7ft King Size Bed
  • Direct Ocean Reef Access
  • Private Freshwater Pool
  • Outdoor Rain Shower
  • Separate Living Area
  • Spacious Over Water Sundeck
  • Complimentary WiFi

LAGOON WATER POOL VILLA

A peaceful overwater oasis complete with private pool & decking that greets the afternoon sun at resort . Take an outdoor siesta on a sunbed or dip into the freshwater pool throughout the day. The cool contemporary look of these luxurious water villas soothes the mind and body & soul. You could also indulge your senses in a spacious freestanding tub. The last rays of the day are captured by Ocean Lagoon Houses–an unspoiled, unforgettable villa experience in the Maldives.

09 units | 250 SqM | up to 03 Adults or 02 adults + 02 Children

  • 7ft King Size Bed
  • Direct Ocean Reef Access
  • Private Freshwater Pool
  • Outdoor Rain Shower
  • Separate Living Area
  • Luxury Bathtub
  • Spacious Over Water Sundeck
  • Complimentary WiFi

BEACH POOL VILLA

This Beach Pool Villa is the perfect choice for sand and sea lovers with lush vegetation this secluded hideaway hugs the shore. The villa features a private courtyard with hammocks swinging in the breeze, and a generously sized pool of freshwater found in the shade of towering trees. A table for two rests on the patio, where meals are shared and glasses clinked against an ocean view backdrop. Intimate corners matched by open-air spaces that dissolve into nature for reflection or romance.

06 units | 450 SqM | up to 03 Adults or 02 adults + 02 Children

  • 7ft King Size Bed
  • Outdoor Rain Shower
  • Separate Living Area
  • Private Freshwater Pool
  • Direct Beach Access
  • Spacious Semi-Private Balcony
  • Outdoor Space
  • Enormous Outdoor Garden Bathroom
  • Complimentary WiFi

TREETOP POOL VILLA ( 1 & 2 BEDROOMS)

Breathtakingly suspended 12 meters above the ground among a canopy of lush palms, Every space in the Treetop pool Villa is infused with serenity. Rise to the early morning birdsong outside, as sunlight glows across a cantilevered pool. Yoga at dawn is best enjoyed with a trainer as the sun rises from the east.

5 units | 220 SqM | up to 03 Adults or 02 adults + 02 Children

  • 220 Square Meters
  • King Bed In Master Bedroom
  • Optional Spa Treatment Room For Couples
  • Optional Second Room With Twin Beds
  • Private Secluded Balcony
  • Outdoor Rain Shower
  • Private Freshwater Pool
  • Living Area
  • Air Conditioning And Overhead Fans
  • Two Luxurious Bathrooms
  • Access To Reserved Beach Area

2-BEDROOM LAGOON WATER POOL VILLA

This 2-bedroom Lagoon Water Pool Villa at the resort is a lovely dwelling with spectacular views and two stylish rooms suitable for families & friends. Nestled in a prime location atop a shimmering lagoon, the Villa has an inviting private freshwater pool that invites, perfect for a splash. The villa has a spacious sundeck great for soaking in rays, reading or in Villa dining. There are also cozy nooks inside when it’s time to enjoy the solitude of the island.

02 units | 400 SqM | up to 04 Adults or 02 adults + 04 Children

  • 7ft King Bed In Master Bedroom
  • 03 Twin Beds In The Second Bedroom
  • Spacious Freshwater Pool
  • Outdoor Rain Shower
  • Luxury Bathtub
  • Separate Living Area
  • Spacious Over Water Sundeck
  • Complimentary WiFi

2-BEDROOM  BEACH POOL VILLA

A relaxed, intimate, generously sized home for  families looking for the luxury castaway experience. This 2 bedroom beach Pool Villa is nestled in tropical greenery, is a peaceful slice of paradise with a large freshwater pool that invites endless sun fun. In the light, sun loungers are there for you to recline by the pool. A six seater table overlooks the water beyond the shoreline, setting the scene for magical moments. Self-contained rooms with private amenities for parents, couples, and kids to easily escape it all.

04 units | 600 SqM | up to 04 Adults or 02 adults + 04 Children

  • 7ft King Bed In Master Bedroom
  • 03 Twin Beds In The Second Bedroom
  • Outdoor Rain Shower
  • Private Freshwater Pool
  • Two Luxurious Bathrooms
  • Air Conditioning And Overhead Fans
  • Direct Beach Access
  • Spacious Semi-Private Balcony
  • Outdoor Space
  • Enormous Outdoor Garden Bathroom
  • Complimentary WiFi

GLAMPING WITH BUBBLE TENT

As a refined form of camping with a luxury twist known as ‘glamping’; This Bubble tent includes access to both indoor and elemental outdoor bathroom facilities, a plunge pool, steam room and sauna too. Look around 360 Degrees and bask in the beautiful scenery of nature and gaze at st the stars at night

This special experience can be booked with 3 luxury glamping packages, for refined camping at its best. Please inquire for more detail.

01 unit | 200 SqM | up to 02 Adults

  • BBQ Dinner Cooked By Amazing Chefs
  • Stargazing Experience With Digestives
  • Floating Breakfast Experience
  • 7ft King Size Bed In The Bedroom
  • Outdoor Rain Shower
  • Private Freshwater Pool
  • Complimentary WiFi

PRIVATE BEACH RESIDENCE

The six sublime 4 Bedroom Beach Residences of the resort delivers style lashings from their ultra-modern Miami-esque architecture to their stunning minimalist interiors. Each has four supremely comfortable bedroom suites, acres of living space, a fabulously furnished kitchen, and a private beachfront swimming pool.

06 units | 1500 SqM | 08 People as standard or  up to 10 People

  • Master Bedrooms With King Size Beds
  • Guest Suite With Twin Beds
  • Living And Dining Lounge
  • Dry Kitchen
  • Open-Sided Dining Deck
  • Swimming Pool
  • Beach Courtyard
  • Front Courtyard
  • Guest Suites
  • Master Suite
  • Staff Area
  • Complimentary WiFi

THE RESORT ESTATE

The Resort Estate offers super-savvy travellers, privacy seekers and celebrities alike possibly the most sought-after six-bedroom home in the Maldives. The glorious beachfront pad of the all-inclusive villa of this resort promises an ultra-luxury away from all island holiday with a breezy laid-back atmosphere for parties up to 14 people.

01 unit | 2500 SqM | 12 People as standard or up to 14 People

  • Master Bedrooms With King Size Beds
  • Guest Suite With Twin Beds
  • Outdoor Dining Lounge And Bar
  • Beach Courtyard
  • Swimming Pool
  • Living Area
  • Guest Suites-Garden Level
  • Cinema & Games Rooms
  • Spa Room
  • Gym
  • Jacuzzi
  • Sunset Deck/Cocktail Lounge
  • Complimentary WiFi

GREAT BEACH VILLA RESIDENCE

The Great Beach Residence is a Miami-style mansion with contemporary architecture. The Great Beach Residence is perfect for large groups of friends and families who seek palatial entertainment space without compromising personal privacy. This residence is great in so many ways in keeping with its name outrageously super-sized living rooms, immense master bedrooms and supremely comfortable guest suites, kitchen and bar with every conceivable gadget and gizmo, two pools and sun terraces, and a myriad of extras including gym equipment, table tennis, pool table, and PlayStation 4.

01 unit | 3000 SqM | 16 People as standard or up to 20 People

  • Master Bedrooms With King Size Beds
  • Guest Suite With Twin Beds
  • Living And Dining Lounge
  • Dry Kitchen
  • Open-Sided Dining Deck
  • Beach Courtyard
  • Swimming Pool
  • Upper-Level Lounge
  • Complimentary WiFi 

RESORT NO 2

MALDIVES BEACH ISLAND RESORT 48 ROOMS – Price U.S.$ 45,000,000

Discover a unique concept in the Maldives:

“No News No Shoes”.

Taste heaven in all its simplicity, in harmony with nature, and in complete tranquility, thanks to the full board and many activities already included in the price.

The resort is one of the most famous islands of the Maldives. This living legend has kept its traditional architecture in a tropical landscape. The resort is unique with its 2 virgin islets, surrounded by a turquoise lagoon, paradise of dolphins.

The island is located in the South Male Atoll, a 50-minute speed boat ride from the airport.

The resort features sea-facing bungalows, each with its own private terrace overlooking the Indian Ocean. The island is located in Kaafu Male South Atoll, 43.5 km from the airport and is a 50-minute speed boat ride.

Charming bungalows with lagoon views, including terraces with sun loungers and hammocks. The tastefully decorated rooms are equipped with fans. Laundry service included.

The lagoon restaurant on stilts, offers a cuisine based on fresh produce. Buffet meal with themed dinners on the beach. Enjoy tropical cocktails at the sunset bar.

Guests can enjoy a variety of water sports including sailing, water-skiing and night snorkeling during their stay at the resort. Other recreation facilities include volleyball, tennis and billiards. The resort features a 5-star PADI scuba diving center offering all PADI courses with professional instructors.

Total n. 48 Room Selection

Standard Bungalow Sea View

De Luxe Bungalow Sea View

Family Room Sea View

 

This unique opportunity has 20 years more head lease balance and with down payment of U.S.$ 5 mil possible to get extension plus 40 years. 

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
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Cliff Jacobs (Nat.Dpl.Hotel Man. (UJ). M.P.R.E.)

Managing Principal / CEO

Exquisite Hotel Consultants (Pty) Ltd

Mobile: +27 (0) 84 413 1071 / +27 (0) 61 716 6951
Landline: +27 (0) 21 554 0283
Emailcliff@exquisitehotelconsultants.com
Skype: cliff.jacobs

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