Relax and Unwind...in Mississippi, USA: for sale


Relax and Unwind...in Mississippi, USA

Vicksburg, Mississippi, United States of America

NEGOTIABLE

985 000 USD

Agent: Cliff Jacobs - Managing Principal Estate Agent & CEO (Nat.Dpl.Hotel Man (UJ). M.P.R.E.)
Agent Cellphone: +27 (0) 84 413 1071 / +27 (0) 61 716 6951
Agent Office Number: +27 (0) 21 554 0283
Agent Email Address: cliff@exquisitehotelconsultants.com
Type: Inn
Bedrooms: 16
Bathrooms: 16
Showers: 16
Parking: 20
Yield: Not Disclosed


Vicksburg, Mississippi

Vicksburg is a historic American city, located on a high bluff on the east bank of the Mississippi River across from Louisiana.

Originally built by French colonists in 1719, the outpost withstood an attack from the native Natchez people. It was incorporated as Vicksburg in 1825 after Methodist missionary Newitt Vick. In the American Civil Car, it was a key Confederate river-port, and its surrender to Ulysses S. Grant in July 1863 marked the turning-point of the war. Vicksburg then had a troubled history of racial conflict, well into the 20th century. The city is home to three large installations of the US Army Corps of Engineers, which has often been involved in local flood control.

Vicksburg is the county seat of Warren County, Mississippi, with a population of 23,856 at the 2010 census.

Siege of Vicksburg

The siege of Vicksburg (May 18 – July 4, 1863) was the final major military action in the Vicksburg campaign of the American Civil War. In a series of maneuvers, Union Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and his Army of the Tennessee crossed the Mississippi River and drove the Confederate Army of Mississippi, led by Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton, into the defensive lines surrounding the fortress city of Vicksburg, Mississippi.

Vicksburg was the last major Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River; therefore, capturing it completed the second part of the Northern strategy, the Anaconda Plan. When two major assaults against the Confederate fortifications, on May 19 and 22, were repulsed with heavy casualties, Grant decided to besiege the city beginning on May 25. After holding out for more than forty days, with their supplies nearly gone, the garrison surrendered on July 4. The successful ending of the Vicksburg campaign significantly degraded the ability of the Confederacy to maintain its war effort. This action, combined with the surrender of the down-river Port Hudson to Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks on July 9, yielded command of the Mississippi River to the Union forces, who would hold it for the rest of the conflict.

The Confederate surrender on July 4, 1863, is sometimes considered when combined with Gen. Robert E. Lee's defeat at Gettysburg by Maj. Gen. George Meade the previous day, the turning point of the war. It cut off the Trans-Mississippi Department (containing the states of Arkansas, Texas and part of Louisiana) from the rest of the Confederate States, effectively splitting the Confederacy in two for the rest of the war.

First People

The area that is now Vicksburg was long occupied by the Natchez Natchez Native Americans as part of their historical territory along the Mississippi. The Natchez spoke a language isolate not related to the Muskogean languages of the other major tribes in the area. Before the Natchez, other indigenous cultures had occupied this strategic area for thousands of years.

European settlement

The first Europeans who settled the area were French colonists who built Fort Saint Pierre in 1719 on the high bluffs overlooking the Yazoo River at present-day Redwood. They conducted fur trading with the Natchez and others and started plantations. On 29 November 1729, the Natchez attacked the fort and plantations in and around the present-day city of Natchez. They killed several hundred settlers, including the Jesuit missionary Father Paul Du Poisson. As was the custom, they took a number of women and children as captives, adopting them into their families.

The Natchez War was a disaster for French Louisiana, and the colonial population of the Natchez District never recovered. Aided by the Choctaw, traditional enemies of the Natchez, though, the French defeated and scattered the Natchez and their allies, the Yazoo.

The Choctaw Nation took over the area by right of conquest and inhabited it for several decades. Under pressure from the US government, the Choctaw agreed to cede nearly 2,000,000 acres (8,100 km2) of land to the US under the terms of the Treaty of Fort Adams in 1801. The treaty was the first of a series that eventually led to the removal of most of the Choctaw to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River in 1830. Some Choctaw remained in Mississippi, citing article XIV of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek; they became citizens of the state and the United States. They struggled to maintain their culture against the pressure of the binary slave society, which classified people as only white or black.

In 1790, the Spanish founded a military outpost on the site, which they called Fort Nogales (nogales meaning "walnut trees"). When the Americans took possession in 1798 following the American Revolutionary War and a treaty with Spain, they changed the name to Walnut Hills. The small village was incorporated in 1825 as Vicksburg, named after Newitt Vick, a Methodist minister who had established a Protestant mission on the site.

Drawing of the hanging of five gamblers in Vicksburg in 1835

In 1835, during the Murrell Excitement, a mob from Vicksburg attempted to expel the gamblers from the city, because the citizens were tired of the rougher element treating the city residents with nothing but contempt. They captured and hanged five gamblers who had shot and killed a local doctor. Historian Joshua D. Rothman calls this event "the deadliest outbreak of extralegal violence in the slave states between the Southhampton Insurrection and the Civil War."

View of Vicksburg in 1855
Political and racial unrest after the Civil War

Celebrations of the 4th of July, the day of surrender, were irregular until 1947. The Vicksburg Evening Post of July 4, 1883, called July 4 "the day we don't celebrate", and another Vicksburg newspaper, the Daily Commercial Appeal, in 1888 hoped that a political victory would bring an enthusiastic celebration the following year. In 1902, the 4th of July saw only "a parade of colored draymen". In 1947, the Jackson Clarion-Ledger stated that the city of Vicksburg did not celebrate the 4th of July again until 1945, and then it was celebrated as Confederate Carnival Day. A recent scholar disagrees, stating that large Fourth of July celebrations were being held by 1907, and informal celebrations before that. A large parade was held in 1890.

In the first few years after the Civil War, white Confederate veterans developed the Ku Klux Klan, beginning in Tennessee; it had chapters throughout the South and attacked freedmen and their supporters. It was suppressed about 1870. By the mid-1870s, new white paramilitary groups had arisen in the Deep South, including the Red Shirts in Mississippi, as whites struggled to regain political and social power over the black majority. Elections were marked by violence and fraud as white Democrats worked to suppress black Republican voting.

20th century to present

Mississippi River Commission building built 1884

The near exclusion of most blacks from the political system lasted for decades until after Congressional passage of civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s. Lynchings of blacks and other forms of white racial terrorism against them continued to occur in Vicksburg after the start of the 20th century. In May 1903, for instance, two black men charged with murdering a planter were taken from jail by a mob of 200 farmers and lynched before they could go to trial. In May 1919, as many as a thousand white men broke down three sets of steel doors to abduct, hang, burn and shoot a black prisoner, Lloyd Clay, who was falsely accused of raping a white woman. From 1877 to 1950 in Warren County, 14 African Americans were lynched by whites, most in the decades near the turn of the century.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers diverted the Yazoo River in 1903 into the old, shallowing channel to revive the waterfront of Vicksburg. The port city was able to receive steamboats again, but much freight and passenger traffic had moved to railroads, which had become more competitive.

Railroad access to the west across the river continued to be by transfer steamers and ferry Barges until a combination of railroad-highway bridge was built in 1929. After 1973, Interstate 20 bridged the river. Freight rail traffic still crosses by the old bridge. North-south transportation links are by the Mississippi River and U.S. Highway 61. Vicksburg has the only crossing over the Mississippi River between Greenville and Natchez, and the only interstate highway crossing of the river between Baton Rouge and Memphis.

During the Great Mississippi Floor of 1927, in which hundreds of thousands of acres were inundated, Vicksburg served as the primary gathering point for refugees. Relief parties put up temporary housing, as the flood submerged a large percentage of the Mississippi Delta.

Because of the overwhelming damage from the flood, the US Army Corps of Engineers established the Waterways Experiment Station as the primary hydraulics laboratory, to develop protection of important croplands and cities. Now known as the Engineer Research and Development Centre, it applies military engineering, information technology, environmental engineering, hydraulic engineering, and geotechnical engineering to problems of flood control and river navigation.

In December 1953, a severe tornado swept across Vicksburg, causing 38 deaths and destroying nearly 1,000 buildings.

A 1910 panorama

During World War II, cadets from the Royal Air Force, flying from their training base at Terrell, Texas, routinely flew to Vicksburg on training flights. The town served as a stand-in for the British for Cologne, Germany, which is the same distance from London, England as Vicksburg is from Terrell.

Particularly after World War II, in which many blacks served, returning veterans began to be active in the civil rights movement, wanting to have full citizenship after fighting in the war. In Mississippi, activists in the Vicksburg Movement became prominent during the 1960s.

Contemporary Vicksburg

In 2001, a group of Vicksburg residents visited the Paducah, Kentucky, mural project, looking for ideas for their own community development. In 2002, the Vicksburg Riverfront murals program was begun by Louisiana mural artist Robert Dafford and his team on the floodwall located on the waterfront in downtown. Subjects for the murals were drawn from the history of Vicksburg and the surrounding area. They include President Theodore Roosevelt's bear hunt, the Sultana, the Sprague, the Siege of Vicksburg, the Kings Crossing site, Willie Dixon, the Flood of 1927, the 1953 Vicksburg, Mississippi tornado, Rosa A. Temple High School (known for integration activism) and the Vicksburg National Military Park. The project was finished in 2009 with the completion of the Jitney Jungle/Glass Kitchen mural.

In the fall of 2010, a new 55-foot mural was painted on a section of the wall on Grove Hill across the street from the original project by former Dafford muralists Benny Graeff and Herb Roe. The mural's subject is the annual "Run thru History" held in the Vicksburg National Military Park.

On December 6–7, 2014, a symposium was held on the 140th anniversary of the 1874 riots. A variety of scholars gave papers and an open panel discussion was held on the second day at the Vicksburg National Military Park, in collaboration with the Jacqueline House African American Museum.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 35.3 sq mi (91 km2), of which 32.9 sq mi (85 km2) are land and 2.4 sq mi (6.2 km2) (6.78%) are covered by water.

Vicksburg is located at the confluence of the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers. Much of the city is on top of a high bluff on the east bank of the Mississippi River. As of the census of 2000, 26,407 people, 10,364 households, and 6,612 families resided in the city, with a metropolitan population of 49,644. The population density was 803.1 people per square mile (310.1/km2). The 11,654 housing units averaged 354.4 per square mile (136.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 60.43% African American, 37.80% White, 0.15% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.43% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 1.04% of the population.

Of the 10,364 households, 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.9% were married couples living together, 24.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were not families. About 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the city, the population was distributed as 28.4% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 82.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,466, and for a family was $34,380. Males had a median income of $29,420 versus $20,728 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,174. About 19.3% of families and 23.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 34.8% of those under age 18 and 16.5% of those age 65 or over.

Annual cultural events

Every summer, Vicksburg plays host to the Miss Mississippi Pageant and Parade. Also every summer, the Vicksburg Homecoming Benevolent Club hosts a homecoming weekend/reunion that provides scholarships to graduating high-school seniors. Former residents from across the country return for the event.

Every spring and summer, Vicksburg Theatre Guild hosts Gold in the Hills, which holds the Guinness World Record for longest-running show.





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Key features

About us

Enjoy one of our luxurious guest rooms (or the Master Bedroom Suite). All have antique queen or king-size beds and furniture, HVAC, cable television, WIFI, private baths, some have whirlpool tubs, gas-burning fireplaces and private porches with views of the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers from the comfort of your rocking chair or swing.

History of our Mansion

The mansion, built in 1873 by John Alexander Klein, was given as a wedding gift to his daughter, Susan and her new husband Isaac Bonham. Susan lived in the home until 1917 and the house became apartments through both WWI and WWII. A Doctor bought the home in 1959 for $5000 and renovated it back into a single-family home. The Ivy's raised their 4 children in the home and put it up for sale in 1985 so they could move closer to their grown children. The Whitney's bought the house from the Ivy's when they were passing through town on their way to Washington, DC from Dallas. They made it into the Bed and Breakfast that it is today by adding 11 guest rooms and furnishing our now, 16 room Inn. The Owners moved to Vicksburg in 2006 and bought the property from the Owner's mother. They are now the Resident Owners and Innkeepers of this 145+year-old property. They will give a detailed tour after breakfast each morning that outlines the stories of Vicksburg and the Klein family. Be sure to allow time in your travel plans to enjoy the rich history of our beautiful home.

Architectural Features

The floor plan of the Mansion is modelled from the floor plan of Cedar Grove, but on a smaller scale since it was built for just one family. The architectural style is a combination of Greek revival and Victorian with Italianate features. The pierced columns are unique to Vicksburg with only about 60 other houses in Vicksburg that have retained their columns. Handmade, each column is unique. Notice the motif of hearts, shamrocks, ring, and diamonds depicting signs of love and marriage.

The gardens, “French Creole Parterre” gardens, are intact as they were originally designed. Even the brick walkways are original with ring and diamond patterns in the layout, representing the signs of love and marriage once again. The historic significance of these gardens was one of the reasons the home was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The iron fence was made especially for this house in Pennsylvania and brought down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.

The bricks on the house were made locally out of clay and fired at low temperatures, so they are soft. The signature brick of the brick mason is located underneath our Historic Register Plaque.

This house is not antebellum since it was built in 1872, after the Civil War. Architecturally, on the Oak Street face, it is like a Southern Louisiana Raised Cottage with lattice-work underneath the elevated gallery. Nonetheless, the house reflects the Victorian period and features a combination of Greek Revival and Italianate architectural styles. The front entrance is classic Greek Revival, while the supports under the eaves and the cast-iron cornices over the windows on the side of the house are particularly Victorian Italianate.

The front gallery and the trims, mouldings, and doors in the main house are made of cypress and are original to the house. The wide-planked heart-of-pine floors are also original.

The Families

Isaac and Susan had two children, John was born in 1875 and Archibald in 1877. When the river changed course in the spring of 1876, the area was a breeding ground for infected mosquitoes, killing many people in Vicksburg. At five years old, in 1882, little Archie died in of diphtheria. Another tragedy struck the family, in August of 1883, when Isaac was accidentally shot while attempting to break up a fight between two of his best friends in a saloon on Washington and Clay Streets. The following year, John died of typhoid fever at the age of nine years. That same year, Susan’s father died at the age of 72. After these tragedies, Susan continued to live at the Mansion, spending a great deal of her time at Cedar Grove until the death of her mother in 1909. She lived with her sister, Clara Birchett, until her death in 1935.

During World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II, this house was used at various times as an apartment and a rooming house with as many as five families living there at one time. In 1959, Dr. Robert and Susan Ivy bought the house for $8,000 and put about $50,000 worth of remodelling into it, returning it to a single-family home.

In 1985, Cliff and Bettye Whitney were traveling to Washington, D.C. from Texas to meet their first grandson. They stopped for the night in Vicksburg and stayed at Cedar Grove. The next morning, while Bettye was exploring the area, she noticed that The Mansion, on the National Register of Historic Places, was for sale. After visiting the house and immediately falling in love with it, by 5 P.M. that day, Cliff and Bettye had signed the contract and purchased the home. They furnished the house with antiques, some they owned previously and the rest bought at auctions and antique stores.

Bettye and Cliff maintained the Mansion as a functioning Bed and Breakfast Inn for 20 years, making numerous improvements to the property. In 2006, the current Owners purchased the home and are carrying on the family tradition.

Accommodation

Master Bedroom Suite

This suite has two bedrooms, a large bath with a tiled shower tub combination. One room has a queen-sized full canopied bed circa 1840, an armoire and a fireplace. The adjoining room has two four-poster twin beds and an armoire. Both rooms have floor to ceiling windows with a view of both the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers. Other Amenities: Flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is wheelchair accessible, and there is a grab bar near the toilet in the bathroom.

Eastlake Room

Eastlake queen-size half tester bed (circa 1870), dresser and night table. This room has 11-foot windows opening onto the glassed-in veranda and beautiful two-level gardens at the rear of the house. It also has a fireplace and a large private bathroom with a shower tub combination. Other Amenities: Flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is wheelchair accessible, the bathroom is not.

Library Room

Paneled with Cypress doors & lined with bookshelves, the room was originally the library and study of the Mansion. It was renovated in the 1960s when Dr. Ivy paneled the room with the doors to add the bathroom. The exterior entry door is behind the bed now, but it was the entrance to his home office.  Go back in time with our extensive selection of civil war history, queen size bed with a tapestry drape, a fainting couch, and two winged back chairs. The private bath has a walk-in tiled shower on one side and a half bath on the other. Other Amenities: Flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is wheelchair accessible, the bathroom is not.

Guest Quarters 1

Restored old quarters with large, airy bathroom and private gallery overlooking two-level gardens. The original servants quarters, these two rooms can be adjoining and have queen-sized full canopied pencil post beds, wide plank pine floors, private bathrooms with 6 X 3 whirlpool tubs and handheld showers.  Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Guest Quarters 2

Restored old quarters with large, airy bathroom and private gallery overlooking two-level gardens. The original servants quarters these two rooms can be adjoining and have queen-sized full canopied pencil post beds, wide plank pine floors, private bathrooms with 6 X 3 whirlpool tubs and handheld showers.  Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Garden Room 2

A large romantic environment with two antique full-sized beds, brick walls, Oriental rugs, seating area, and bench. Private brick terrace opening onto parterre gardens at the front of the house. Refrigerator and microwave in room. Private bathroom with a whirlpool tub. Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Blue Room

A country Victorian motif with a provincial print on the wallpaper and a queen size bed with a brass headboard. There is also a single sleigh bed in this room that may be used as a settee. Private bath with tiled shower. On the second floor.  Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Stained Glass Room

This name comes from the antique stained glass window in the room. Wallpapered in companion Victorian prints, it has a queen-size brass bed, a twin daybed, and beautiful armoire. Private bath with tiled shower. On the second floor. Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Rose Room

The queen-sized Victorian bed (circa 1850) is covered with a quilt that complements the settee, chair, and the floral wallpaper. The armoire and dresser are of the same Victorian period. Private bath with tiled shower. On the second floor. Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Galleries 1

Antique queen size bed and two twin beds, one that may be used as a settee. Sitting area for relaxing with your laptop and surfing the “net”. Private bath with whirlpool tub. Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Galleries 2

Antique king size bed and a settee. Sitting area for relaxing with your laptop and surfing the “net” while enjoying a nice fire in your fireplace. Private bath with whirlpool tub. Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Galleries 3

This room has a king-size four-poster bed and two twin beds, one that may be used as a settee. Fireplace, porch with two rocking chairs and a private bath with a whirlpool tub. Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Galleries 4

An antique bed that is converted to accommodate a King size mattress. Relax on your sofa in front of your fireplace, enjoy the view of the Mississippi River from your room or rocking chair on the porch or take notes or play a game at your table with two chairs. Private bath with whirlpool tub and handheld shower. Other Amenities:  HVAC temperature can be controlled by the guests from an in-room thermostat, flat-screen TV, WIFI and charging stations for your mobile devices.

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Cottage on the Green

The Cottage on the Green has two bedrooms and one bath on the second floor and a living room, dining room and kitchen on the first floor with laundry in the basement. 

This room is not wheelchair accessible due to stairs.

Most Popular

Pet-Friendly |  Free Parking  |  Non-smoking Rooms  |  Free WiFi  |  Family Rooms

Outdoors

  • Sun Deck
  • Terrace
  • Garden

Pets

Pets are allowed in Galleries 3, Quarters 2 and Garden Room 2 and there is no extra charge.

Activities

  • Tour or class about local culture
  • Walking tours
  • Bar Crawls
  • Open-air bath
  • Library
  • Golf course (within 2 miles)

Internet

WiFi is available in all areas and is free of charge.

Parking

Free private parking is available on site (reservation is not needed).

Services

  • Daily housekeeping
  • Shared lounge/TV area
  • Concierge
  • Baggage storage
  • Fax/Photocopying
  • Tour desk
  • Honeymoon suite
  • Business center
  • Meeting/Banquet facilities
  • Room service

Entertainment & Family Services

  • Kids' TV channels
  • Books, DVDs & music for kids
  • Board games/Puzzles

General

  • WiFi in all areas
  • Designated smoking area
  • Air conditioning
  • Heating
  • Family rooms
  • Facilities for disabled guests
  • Non-smoking rooms
  • Pet-friendly

Food & Drink

  • Special diet meals (on request).
  • Breakfast in the room

Events & Weddings

Let us help make your event even more special at The Corners...We'll help you plan all the details and enjoy the elegant setting. When you have an event at The Corners Mansion, you can enjoy:

  • A long front porch with rocking chairs and views of the rivers
  • An elegant double parlour with a baby grand and two fireplaces
  • A formal dining room for buffets and sit down dinners
  • A relaxing glassed-in back verandah overlooking the gardens
  • A lovely back courtyard with 100-year-old crape myrtles

All Events are Possible

  • When family and friends stay in the guest rooms, The Corners Mansion becomes your home.
  • Family Reunions
  • Weddings, Rehearsal Dinners, Bridesmaid Luncheons
  • Announcement Parties
  • Birthday Parties, Children's and Ladies Tea Parties and Showers
  • Corporate Retreats, Retirement Parties, Memorial Receptions

Attractions

Vicksburg National Military Park

Gibraltar of the Confederacy

Confederate President Jefferson Davis remarked, "Vicksburg is the nailhead that holds the South’s two halves together.” At the start of the Civil War, Confederates controlled the Mississippi River south of Cairo, Illinois all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. With its valuable commercial port and railroad hub, the city was of tremendous importance. From points west of the Mississippi River, men, food, salt, and weapons, funneled through Mexico, made their way to Vicksburg and Confederate armies in the East.

Confederate engineers capably fortified strategic positions like Vicksburg. With its riverfront artillery batteries and a ring of forts with over 170 cannon, the Confederate leadership was confident that Vicksburg was safe from Union incursions. Even from the north and east, the natural topography with a maze of swamps and bayous offered a seemingly impregnable defence that kept General Grant's army at bay for much of the eighteen-month campaign. President Abraham Lincoln also realized the necessity to capture Vicksburg. Remarking, "Vicksburg is the key the key! The war can never be brought to a close until that key is in our pocket.” The capture of this "Gibraltar of the Confederacy" was an immediate priority for Lincoln. If Vicksburg fell, Union forces could isolate Texas, Arkansas, and much of Louisiana, cutting off Confederate supplies and personnel. As the war progressed, Federal naval and ground forces pushed south from Illinois, and north from the Gulf of Mexico as they closed in on Vicksburg. In 1863, they set their sights on Vicksburg, the Fortress City. The fate of the Confederacy would lie largely with the fate of Vicksburg.

Monuments and Commemoration

Quickly after the siege ended, both Union and Confederate veterans began planning how to remember the sacrifices of the battle. Today, Vicksburg National Military Park is home to over 1,300 monuments, tablets, and markers, earning the title of The largest Outdoor Art Gallery in the World.

State Monuments: Many of the states who sent troops to fight at Vicksburg have erected monuments and memorials in their honour.

Memorial Arch: Dedicated in 1920, the Memorial Arch was built as a lasting tribute to a Veterans' and Peace Reunion in 1917.

Navy Monument: A massive obelisk, this monument pays tribute to the vital role the US Navy played in the campaign for Vicksburg.

African American Monument: Dedicated in 2003, this monument honors the sacrifices of the African Americans who served in the campaign.

Monument Artists: Dozens of prominent 19th and 20th-century artists helped design the monuments and memorials that foster connections for visitors to understand the battlefield.

Old Court House Museum

Confederate flags, including one that was never surrendered, the tie worn by Jefferson Davis at his inauguration as Confederate President, fine portraits, china and silver, exquisite antique furniture, the trophy antlers won by the steamboat Robert E Lee in an 1870 race, antebellum clothing, toys, Indian and pioneer implements, and an original Teddy Bear given to a local child by Theodore Roosevelt are just a few of the thousands of artifacts which are housed in the Old Warren County Court House Museum- Eva W. Davis Memorial.

The Old Warren County Court House, built in 1858, stands today as Vicksburg’s most historic structure and has hosted such guests and speakers as Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Booker T. Washington, Teddy Roosevelt, and William McKinley.

Lower Mississippi River Museum

Museum Exhibits

Explore life on the Mississippi River! Find out how different communities, farming families, and the US Army Corps of Engineers have all utilized the river.  Choose your own adventure on the river with the Mississippi Trail Interactive.  Hear what the 1927 flood was like for a family that lived through it.  See some of the river's fish up close in our 1,515-gallon aquarium.

Mississippi River Flood Model

The Mississippi River watershed is the third largest watershed in the world.  Visit our outdoor scaled model of a section of the Mighty Mississippi River.  This flood model allows visitors to see how different factors can change a river.  Visitors can also become acquainted with the names of sites along the river near Vicksburg.

 

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CMI the corners mansion (16)
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CMI the corners mansion (18)
CMI the corners mansion (19)
CMI the corners mansion (20)
CMI the corners mansion (21)
CMI the corners mansion (22)
CMI the corners mansion (23)
CMI the corners mansion (24)
CMI the corners mansion (25)
CMI the corners mansion (26)
CMI the corners mansion
CMI the library room
CMI the master bedroom suite
CMI 5170
CMI 5187
CMI 5189
CMI 5193
CMI 9620
CMI 0032
CMI 0153
CMI 0283
CMI 0421
CMI 0494
CMI 0597
CMI 0620
CMI 0697
CMI 0801
CMI 0972
CMI 0982
CMI 2629

Cliff Jacobs (Nat.Dpl.Hotel Man. (UJ). M.P.R.E.)

Managing Principal / CEO

Exquisite Hotel Consultants (Pty) Ltd

Mobile: +27 (0) 84 413 1071 / +27 (0) 61 716 6951
Landline: +27 (0) 21 554 0283
Emailcliff@exquisitehotelconsultants.com
Skype: cliff.jacobs

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